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Hamptons Life

Oct 21, 2019 4:58 AMPublication: The East Hampton Press & The Southampton Press

When Moran Went West

Oct 21, 2019 4:58 AM

Your last chance to experience “Thomas Moran Discovers the American West,” an exhibition presented by the East Hampton Historical Society, is quickly approaching. The show, which is on view at the Thomas & Mary Nimmo Moran Studio on Main Street in East Hampton, is an illustrated journey of Moran’s 1871 trip to Wyoming. His adventures there inspired both the art world and the National Parks Service.

Curated by Richard Barons, the historical society’s chief curator, “Treasures from Yellowstone” is an artful and historically curated exhibition that took over two years to assemble. Over 70 items — many on temporary loan — detail Moran’s participation in the 1871 Hayden Expedition to Wyoming. The story of his journey is told through oil paintings, watercolors, period maps, stereographic cards, wood engravings, photographs, late 19th century publications and Moran’s personal items. During these final few weeks, Barons will be on-site to personally take visitors through this illustrated journey, which helped inspire creation of the National Parks Service and galvanized a group of artists to promote America’s pride in its landscapes and natural wonders.

A substantial portion of this exhibition is material that is returning to Moran’s studio after being gifted to Yellowstone National Park in the 1940s. In addition, the exhibition was made possible by the generous temporary loan of paintings and artifacts from highly respected institutions and museums, including the U.S. Department of the Interior, National Parks Service, Museum of Yellowstone, Parrish Art Museum, Guild Hall, Brigham Young University Library, private collectors and renowned libraries and galleries.

This exhibition illustrates how Moran became a leader of both the National Parks movement and the art world. It’s a rare opportunity to experience these major works of art, all under the roof of the recently renovated Moran home and studio (circa 1884), 229 Main Street, East Hampton. For more information visit easthamptonhistory.org.

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