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3 Comments by AniiBrown


Shinnecock Tribal Member Given More Time To Fight For Beach Parking Rights In Village

Hello everyone,

They say to never read the comments, but I often find the ignorance most amusing. "If you want to come off your land," has to be my favorite comment here (LOL)!

To clarify, Southampton settled Shinnecock territory, not the other way around. So it is all OUR land, which we so kindly welcomed, shared, and taught your forefathers to survive off of, albeit to our own dismay as we have been exploited ever since. However, “[WHEN we] want to come off…”—from behind the reservation borders that protect what is left of our territory from further exploitation—and use the area’s public resources, we are well within our rights!

We Shinnecock have never abrogated our rights. Our original treaties are with the Crown of England, not the Village, not the Town, and not the State, each of whom has never aptly compensated our Nation for the Shinnecock land that was taken. So for Shinnecock to be expected to pay to access our aboriginal property, which in fact was illegally divested under the Non-intercourse Act of 1790, is illogical by any means. Even IF it was legal, there are still Federal Public Indian Laws that prohibit taxation to use public resources.

We do have waterfront property, two parcels in fact, the Shinnecock bay that surrounds our reservation and the Peconic Bay overlooked by our Westwoods property in Hampton Bays. (To this day I cannot peacefully enjoy Westwoods without being called out my name and racially accosted by trespassing locals who knowingly violate the cliffs where we have ceremony—but that is a whole other battle). Nevertheless, I am sure you are aware that the Atlantic Ocean is different than a bay, and to that body of water we have no reasonable access.

Our water rights have been maintained through Federal Trust, Wyndanch’s Deed, the Fort Albany Treaty, as well as the riparian system of NYS English Common Law, to name only a few legislations. Our hunting and fishing rights were further confirmed in 2009 when the federal courts refused to argue otherwise in NYS vs. Smith. As a Federally Recognized tribe since 2010, Shinnecock is currently working with federal agencies that continue to support our rights to access public waters. However, we can even further discuss this violation from the perspective of the United Nations Declaration of Rights for Indigenous People, which the U.S. signed in 2010.

We The People of the Stony Shore have since time immemorial continued to access all waters in our aboriginal territory to exercise these rights. Just because the Village has enacted policy to regulate it’s own residents and visitors does not negate the rights of Shinnecock people. However, the Village code does need to be clarified to include our distinction so people like you and others do not continue to interpret these rights to exclude the First People of this land.

We Shinnecock did not turn the beach into a business, the revenues of which are supposedly used to preserve the shores from disturbance of tourists and pollutants. In addition, we did not invite the tourists, we did not create the pollutants and we did just fine in maintaining these shores prior to the business of selling the beach. And really, if you want to get technical, it is quite possible we are entitled to partake in the revenues from the beach. But we are not asking for money. We are simply asking for local municipalities to respect and acknowledge Shinnecock’s rights not to be alienated in our own home.

As American citizens we are all equally responsible for following the law. However, the reality is that the dynamics of how America was established—on the graves of Native my ancestors that are still being desecrated by McMansions today—certain respects must be maintained to acknowledge, as Bernie Sanders put it, “a debt that can never be repaid.” I understand that this may be a reality that many of Americans may want to discount. However, it is something that we indigenous people endure everyday as we are treated like second citizens in our own and only home, the sentiments of which are very well conveyed in the above comments.

Respectfully,
Ms. Brown" May 19, 16 1:55 PM

Hello everyone,

They say to never read the comments, but I often find the ignorance most amusing. "If you want to come off your land," has to be my favorite comment here (LOL)!

To clarify, Southampton settled Shinnecock territory, not the other way around. So it is all OUR land, which we so kindly welcomed, shared, and taught your forefathers to survive off of, albeit to our own dismay as we have been exploited ever since. However, “[WHEN we] want to come off…”—from behind the reservation borders that protect what is left of our territory from further exploitation—and use the area’s public resources, we are well within our rights!

We Shinnecock have never abrogated our rights. Our original treaties are with the Crown of England, not the Village, not the Town, and not the State, each of whom has never aptly compensated our Nation for the Shinnecock land that was taken. So for Shinnecock to be expected to pay to access our aboriginal property, which in fact was illegally divested under the Non-intercourse Act of 1790, is illogical by any means. Even IF it was legal, there are still Federal Public Indian Laws that prohibit taxation to use public resources.

We do have waterfront property, two parcels in fact, the Shinnecock bay that surrounds our reservation and the Peconic Bay overlooked by our Westwoods property in Hampton Bays. (To this day I cannot peacefully enjoy Westwoods without being called out my name and racially accosted by trespassing locals who knowingly violate the cliffs where we have ceremony—but that is a whole other battle). Nevertheless, I am sure you are aware that the Atlantic Ocean is different than a bay, and to that body of water we have no reasonable access.

Our water rights have been maintained through Federal Trust, Wyndanch’s Deed, the Fort Albany Treaty, as well as the riparian system of NYS English Common Law, to name only a few legislations. Our hunting and fishing rights were further confirmed in 2009 when the federal courts refused to argue otherwise in NYS vs. Smith. As a Federally Recognized tribe since 2010, Shinnecock is currently working with federal agencies that continue to support our rights to access public waters. However, we can even further discuss this violation from the perspective of the United Nations Declaration of Rights for Indigenous People, which the U.S. signed in 2010.

We The People of the Stony Shore have since time immemorial continued to access all waters in our aboriginal territory to exercise these rights. Just because the Village has enacted policy to regulate it’s own residents and visitors does not negate the rights of Shinnecock people. However, the Village code does need to be clarified to include our distinction so people like you and others do not continue to interpret these rights to exclude the First People of this land.

We Shinnecock did not turn the beach into a business, the revenues of which are supposedly used to preserve the shores from disturbance of tourists and pollutants. In addition, we did not invite the tourists, we did not create the pollutants and we did just fine in maintaining these shores prior to the business of selling the beach. And really, if you want to get technical, it is quite possible we are entitled to partake in the revenues from the beach. But we are not asking for money. We are simply asking for local municipalities to respect and acknowledge Shinnecock’s rights not to be alienated in our own home.

As American citizens we are all equally responsible for following the law. However, the reality is that the dynamics of how America was established—on the graves of our ancestors that are still being desecrated by McMansions today—certain respects must be maintained to acknowledge, as Bernie Sanders put it, “a debt that can never be repaid.” I understand that this may be a reality that many of Americans may want to discount. However, it is something that we indigenous people endure everyday as we are treated like second citizens in our own and only home, the sentiments of which are very well conveyed in the above comments.

Respectfully,
Ms. Brown" May 19, 16 2:02 PM

Shinnecock Indian Nation Gets National Support From Tribes For Billboard Project

Funny, respect was never an issue before 1640--I wonder where such uncivilized behavior came from... As for dirty laundry, that depends: has your community survived genocide only to be robbed of its basic means of subsistence and invaded by murderers and thieves whose affluent decedents do EVERYTHING in their power to constantly rip away any authority you have over what little remains of your home?
If that sounds like you, then by all means put a billboard up in your front yard and join the Nation in court. " Aug 2, 19 11:28 PM